Retain Attendees by Applying “The Come Back Effect”

By Leigh Harper, August 7, 2018

The Come Back Effect“The Come Back Effect,” hospitality guru Jason Young’s new book on guest experience, became available on July 31. Young partnered with church consultant Jonathan Malm for the book, which includes a foreword from Andy Stanley.

In the book, Young and Malm share stories from their own hospitality careers, as well as examine how Jesus practiced hospitality. The term “come back effect” describes the mindset and strategies churches, organizations and businesses can adopt in order to ensure first-time guests will want to return. Young and Malm’s anecdotes illustrate that people “come back” because of how they feel, regardless of the quality of the content.

This content is relevant to professionals in the events industry who curate experiences. Planners aim for retention during events—hence tactics like saving the most popular speakers for last—and also in the long-term. Each event is a recruitment tool for the next. Young and Malm want to teach planners how to engage attendees so well that during the final session of one gathering, they’re ready to register for the next.

Malm has written authored multiple books on guest experience and church communications. Young’s first book, “The Table of Influence: What Successful People Know That You Should Too,” was published in 2012.

“The Come Back Effect” has been praised by leaders such as Lif Church pastor and author Craig Groeschel and Catalyst President Tyler Reagin.

 

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