How to Craft a Strategic Email Strategy

By Mindy Hylton, December 1, 2017

Email campaigns are often the main method of communication for connecting with your audience. While there is not a one-size-fits-all plan, use these steps as a starting point to develop a solid email strategy that doesn’t get lost in the clutter of inboxes.

Be consistent.

Your message should be simple, clear, memorable and—most importantly—in line with your brand. Your brand is more than a logo. It’s also the voice you use, the colors you choose and the design you go with in layout. Voice is your brand’s personality. It can be professional, witty, light-hearted or all business, but it must stay consistent. Color and design layout can vary, but should be similar from email to email for your audience to recognize. A brand is built by keeping all of these things consistent throughout an email campaign.

Change it up.

Brand and voice should remain the same, but your tone and message can change depending on the audience and what you’re trying to convey. Early in the email campaign, focus on the facts: dates, registration information, location, etc. Here, the tone is to concisely give attendees the information they need. Later in the campaign, you will have more details to give and expand upon: networking receptions, after-parties, golf tournaments and more.

Segment your lists.

Divide your email lists into groups such as past attendees, registered attendees and prospects. Your message to each one of these will vary. Past attendees are familiar with your event, so a simple save the date will suffice. Prospects need more information to build trust and interest. Registered attendees want to know travel information, check-in details, what to expect and any updated information about the event. Once you have determined your content and segmented your lists, set your email schedule and push them out to each market.

Content is key.

The core of your campaign should revolve around invitations (save the date, register now), reminders (early-bird special, last-minute change or incentives) and informational emails (new details, look who’s coming or travel details). Know your audience and stick with relevant content. Don’t send an invitation to someone who has already registered. Instead, send new information on what to expect. For previous attendees, the email’s focus can be on returning to an event they know and value rather than giving them general background info on your event.


Mindy HyltonMindy Hylton is director of content marketing with Connect Travel, a division of Connect.

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