Bently Reserve Reveals the First Standing Desk Boardrooms

By Leigh Harper, November 15, 2016

Two boardrooms in San Francisco event venue Bently Reserve are now equipped with adjustable standing desk tables.  Each room can accommodate 10 people.

“We wanted to create something that is very San Francisco,” says Jim Bruels, director of events and sales at Bently Reserve, a 1924 Federal Reserve building that was transformed into office and event space in 2005. It was one of the first buildings in the United States to receive LEED certification.

“Standing boardrooms speak directly to that LEED certification and our company’s commitment to invest in people,” notes Bruels. “Being green doesn’t just mean the environment; it means your health too.”

Bruels and his team sought sustainability in decorating the boardrooms as well. The furniture was purchased from a company that no longer needed it, and a rotating display of paintings by local artists is provided through a partnership with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Can’t make it to San Fran, but interested in hosting a stand-up meeting? Here’s our list of best practices for hosting the first stand-up meeting at your office.

> Plan for the meeting to last no longer than 30 minutes.

> Distribute an agenda in advance and inform participants of the format.

> Prepare the room by arriving early to push chairs against walls and set up an easel and whiteboard for note taking, since it’s difficult to capture notes electronically while standing.

> Open the meeting by explaining briefly the benefits of a stand-up meeting.

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